Norwegian Safer Internet Centre: COVID-19 resources

The Norwegian Safer Internet Centre has published a number of resources (in Norwegian) on staying safe online during the COVID-19 pandemic. You can find them below.

* Please note – resource listings are being added to regularly, so please check back often for the latest information *

  • General advice

    • Children's corona safety rules. Information on COVID-19 can be confusing and scary for children at this difficult time. In order to provide easily understandable guidelines, the Norwegian helpline, Kors på halsen, has launched the 'Children's corona safety rules', a list of five rules developed by and for children to deal with the situation, including keeping in touch with/caring for friends and family via digital platforms and listening credible information only. The campaign was launched on 13 March, as a challenge in cooperation with five Norwegian top TikTokers. Later, it was extended to Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat.
  • Positive content and well-being at home

    • Let's talk about games. Many children play computer games, especially these days, and this can cause frustration between parents and children if they don't understand each other. The sooner you show interest and get involved in what your children are doing, the easier it is to set boundaries and reach a compromise with them. This articles offers some tips to do it.
  • How to respond to online risks under the COVID-19 pandemic

    • Stop, think and check. The Norwegian Media Authority, together with Faktisk.no, has launched a campaign to help young people identify misinformation and fake news and foster their critical thinking and source checking when they find information online. The campaign includes a quiz, a video and several tutorials. Some content was launched in August 2019, but it has been adapted for the current COVID-19 pandemic.
    • Parental guide for social media. Young people spend a lot of time on social media, and many say that they share things which are important for them. There is no doubt: social media plays an important role in children and young people lives, and parents have an important task to follow up and understand what they do. This page offers some information on how the most popular social media platforms among children and adolescents work, and what parents and children should talk about when they use them.

The Norwegian Safer Internet Centre also provides helpline services allowing children and young people, and parents and carers to access personalised advice and support. Equally, it provides a hotline for reporting any illegal content you mind find online. Don't hesitate to contact them in case of need!

In addition, we'll be bringing you a range of articles and insights on the opportunities and challenges of being online during COVID-19 in the coming days and weeks. Keep checking the Better Internet for Kids (BIK) portal and follow our social channels on Twitter (@Insafenetwork and @SafeInternetDay) and Facebook (@SaferInternet and @SaferInternetDay) for the latest news, information, advice and resources from the Insafe network and from other stakeholder organisations on staying safe online during the coronavirus pandemic.

Discover more resources published by European Safer Internet Centres in a variety of European languages >>


Related news

Safer Internet Day 2019 in Norway: GDPR, social media and children under 13

  • Awareness
  • 04/03/2019
  • Norwegian Safer Internet Centre

Since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) made its way through Europe last summer, a new discussion has emerged – and it is perhaps high time: what does the age limits and ratings on social media mean? And when do we, as grown-ups, determine that it is "ok to join"?

Norwegian Media Authority publishes survey on fake news

  • Awareness
  • 29/06/2017
  • Norwegian Safer Internet Centre

The June 2017 edition of the Better Internet for Kids (BIK) bulletin focuses on the highly topical issue of fake news. Here, Tone Haugan-Hepsø and Ida A. Erikstad from the Norwegian Media Authority (national coordinator of Norway's Safer Internet Centre (SIC)) update us on a recent survey on the issue.