Cyberbullying guide for educators, parents and family members

Here on the Better Internet for Kids (BIK) portal, we're always pleased to hear from different stakeholders on how they contribute to a better and safer internet for children and young people in their own areas of work and activities.

We were recently contacted by Lauren Bradshaw, a freelance writer, on a cyberbullying resource she has compiled. The resource, presented as an online guide, offers important and useful information for teachers, parents and family members on cyberbullying: what it is, the laws around it, and what adults can do to help prevent cyberbullying from happening.

Lauren writes: "Children and teens, who are just learning to navigate social relationships, often find themselves in social situations that are fraught with awkward exchanges. When the line between normal, even acceptable, playful teasing crosses into bullying, problems arise. It's often difficult for them, and even adults, to discern when teasing becomes bullying, and when a laughing together becomes laughing at someone else's expense. Simply put, bullying can be boiled down to unwanted social attention. While it can be subtle or blatant; take place online, or in public; be physical or aggressive; there are a few characteristics that can help define bullying."

Read the full guide online here.

We will also be tackling cyberbullying in the next edition of the Better Internet for Kids (BIK) bulletin, due out at the end of March 2017. Subscribe here to receive a copy direct to your email inbox when published.

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