Safer Internet Day celebrations in Hungary

  • Awareness
  • 28/02/2017
  • Hungarian Safer Internet Centre

Safer Internet Day (SID) was celebrated on 7 February 2017 right across the globe. With a theme of "Be the change: Unite for a better internet", the day called upon all stakeholders to join together to make the internet a safer and better place for all, and especially for children and young people. Here we hear from our Hungarian Safer Internet Centre (SIC) on how they marked the day.

At the SID event in Budapest, Dr. Peter Edvi, President of the International Children's Safety Service (ICSS) welcomed the participants to the event, which has now become a tradition of Safer Internet Day. He outlined how the day aims to raise awareness of the importance of the proper use of the internet, stressing how parents have a great responsibility to their children to acquire this knowledge, and stating that it is important that all participants take the opportunity to discuss their experiences with each other. This year, the Berzsenyi High School was selected as the venue for the national event as, in recent years, it has been one of the most active schools in the youth panel activities of the Hungarian Safer Internet Programme.

At the event, the winners of a competition for Hungarian primary and secondary school pupils and students in higher education were announced, based around submitting photos or creating posters. The competition was designed to motivate young people to use various media to produce artwork focusing on a secure internet topic, thus drawing attention to the potential of the internet's countless opportunities, and to show how to use the social and multimedia icons popular with children and young people. More than 60 posters and photos were submitted, across 14 entries, from all areas of the country, with the primary school age group being the most active. Also during the event, students could play the Hungarian SIC's board game, "Likehunter", and could also escape from the "escape room" to save Gordon.

Find out more about the work of the Hungarian Safer Internet Centre, including its awareness raising, helpline, hotline and youth participation services.


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